Teaching

    “ For apart from inquiry, apart from the praxis, individuals cannot be truly human. Knowledge emerges only through invention and re-invention, through the restless, impatient, continuing, hopeful inquiry human beings pursue in the world, with the world, and with each other. ”                                    ― Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed  I am Ph.D. candidate in the Graduate School of Geography at Clark University. I have been an educator, both formally and informally, for nearly a decade, teaching in settings as diverse as classrooms in Northern India and to the Monongahela National Forest in the heart of West Virginia, and to students ranging from former Tibetan political prisoners to college students at Clark University.  My research largely deals with the stories we tell (and don't tell) about climate change, and the majority of my educational practice focuses on environmental issues. To date, I have taught, and helped teach, courses ranging from Global/Local Environmental Justice to The Arctic in the Anthropocene. I am looking forward to developing my own Introduction to Environmental Studies course to teach in the near future.   I believe that education is transformative. It is a way of knowing the world, and also of changing the world. Education is at the heart of all the work that I do. Below you will find links to a statement on my teaching philosophy, my syllabus for an Introduction to Environmental Studies course, some samples of related instructional materials, and  a recorded lecture on the basics of the Anthropocene.  I.  Teaching Statement   II.  Syllabus   III.  Instructional Materials   IV.  Recorded Lecture   Feel free to get in touch  here  if you have any questions!

 

For apart from inquiry, apart from the praxis, individuals cannot be truly human. Knowledge emerges only through invention and re-invention, through the restless, impatient, continuing, hopeful inquiry human beings pursue in the world, with the world, and with each other.” 
                                  ― Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed

I am Ph.D. candidate in the Graduate School of Geography at Clark University. I have been an educator, both formally and informally, for nearly a decade, teaching in settings as diverse as classrooms in Northern India and to the Monongahela National Forest in the heart of West Virginia, and to students ranging from former Tibetan political prisoners to college students at Clark University.

My research largely deals with the stories we tell (and don't tell) about climate change, and the majority of my educational practice focuses on environmental issues. To date, I have taught, and helped teach, courses ranging from Global/Local Environmental Justice to The Arctic in the Anthropocene. I am looking forward to developing my own Introduction to Environmental Studies course to teach in the near future. 

I believe that education is transformative. It is a way of knowing the world, and also of changing the world. Education is at the heart of all the work that I do. Below you will find links to a statement on my teaching philosophy, my syllabus for an Introduction to Environmental Studies course, some samples of related instructional materials, and  a recorded lecture on the basics of the Anthropocene.

I. Teaching Statement

II. Syllabus

III. Instructional Materials

IV. Recorded Lecture

Feel free to get in touch here if you have any questions!